This page is also available in: Spanish

Anti trafficking project at Tra On in Vinh Long Province in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. Many young people have succumbed to being trafficked for marriage or work in neighboring countries, and this project addresses the problem. In this image the vice-principal of Tra On high school, Ngoc Bich, talks to a group of 12th graders about the problem. Credits: Sean Sprague/ CRS

Anti trafficking project at Tra On in Vinh Long Province in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. Many young people have succumbed to being trafficked for marriage or work in neighboring countries, and this project addresses the problem. In this image the vice-principal of Tra On high school, Ngoc Bich, talks to a group of 12th graders about the problem.
Credits: Sean Sprague/ CRS

The 8th of March marks International Women’s Day which celebrates the achievements of women around the world. But for all the women who achieve success, there are also women who suffer great difficulties in achieving even the basic necessities for a healthy and happy life.

In its work, Caritas’ focuses on the effects of migration on women. Migrants represent 2.9 percent of the world’s population and half of these are women. Women who migrate from their country often work in people’s homes in their new country and are vulnerable to abuse.

On International Women’s Day Caritas is calling on governments and the international community to protect migrants who work in people’s homes as maids, nannies and carers from exploitation.

What the world needs to remember is that these women who care for us in our own homes and who make huge sacrifices to find a job abroad, also need caring for themselves.

Learn more by reading our:

Press release: Protect maids, nannies and carers from exploitation

Prayer: The woman next to you

Feature stories:

  • From Mongolia to Brussels