Mass for migrants in Mexican wilderness

By |2 April 2014|

US bishops celebrated Mass for migrants on the US-Mexico border. Caritas and the US Bishops work together prompting the rights of migrants who are children.
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    Protecting Nepalese children from trafficking and unsafe migration

Protecting Nepalese children from trafficking and unsafe migration

By |25 March 2014|

Through a combination of awareness-raising programmes, radio outreach and training, Caritas Nepal is working to prevent human trafficking, unsafe migration and violence against women along some of Nepal's border areas.

Lifting the lid on human trafficking

By |29 January 2014|

Pope Francis says human trafficking is a crime against humanity. Caritas and other Christian organisations work together through COATNET to expose the crime.

Buying and selling people

By |21 January 2014|

Almost 21 million people are the victims of trafficking. The vast majority are from Asia and are women. Christian organisations supported by Caritas Internationalis are working together to combat trafficking.

Christian organisations tackle labour exploitation

By |16 January 2014|

The anti-trafficking network COATNET will meet in Madrid next week to discuss trafficking for labour exploitation and domestic servitude. Moreover, members of the network will outline their common plan and collective actions for the coming years.

Trafficked from Sri Lanka to Jordan as a maid

By |27 August 2013|

Some Sri Lankan people here like my baby. I have been offered 500 Jordanian dinars for her.

Caritas behind the fight against trafficking

By |9 November 2012|

COATNET (Christian Organisations Against Trafficking NETwork) is an ecumenical network of organisations working with Christian churches which is coordinated by Caritas Internationalis.

Selling lies: human trafficking in Romania

By |26 September 2012|

Adrian’s is a success story for ADPARE, a group that works with Caritas and other charities to help trafficking survivors begin again. After a lot of counselling with ADPARE and a lot of hard work at school, Adrian is adjusting well to his new life and is excelling in his classes.

Trafficking in Latin America

By |11 September 2012|

By Martina Liebsch, Caritas Internationalis Policy and Advocacy Director

You could hear a pin drop when during the above mentioned conference the audience was confronted with the magnitude of the phenomenon of trafficking in Latin America. The evidence was presented as a film done by youngsters who travelling throughout the continent collected evidence in bars, on the streets, interviewing victims of trafficking, often minors, and bar owners and pimps. A shocking evidence of a continent which is seen as a continent of joy and sharing. This was evident as well in the testimonies of those who are working with persons which are being exploited.

But the conference as such was a great sign of hope! It is amazing what a group of engaged, lay volunteers can set up with reaching out to their contacts and networks! The participants and experts intervening, a mix of representatives from academia, religious congregations, engaged lay […]

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    Migrants brave deserts and shipwrecks to reach safety in Italy

Migrants brave deserts and shipwrecks to reach safety in Italy

By |18 June 2012|

At a migrant centre near the banks of the Tiber River, a Caritas case worker talks about an African woman targeted in her home country for political reasons: Caritas helped her pay her rent in Rome while she got on her feet.

Photo exhibit highlights plight of Nepali women

By |16 May 2012|

Caritas staff members and colleagues from six continents were in Rome for Caritas Internationalis governance meetings this week. They also had time to  see a photo exhibit showcasing Caritas’ work to stop human trafficking and unsafe migration. The exhibit, hosted at the residence of U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See Miguel Diaz and funded by the U.S. Embassy to the Holy See, featured images of young women in Nepal who are at risk of being trafficked. The photographs, which were taken by Katie Orlinsky, showed rural and urban scenes of women in Nepal, one of Asia’s poorest countries. Caritas members around the world work together to raise awareness of false job advertising and other tactics that traffickers use to lure women into unsafe situations.

Sold out: Migration and human trafficking in Nepal

By |27 April 2012|

In Asia’s slums or impoverished villages, women and teenage girls will listen when a well-dressed stranger offers them a job. In Nepal, a poor country on the northeast border with India, thousands of young women leave their homes in search of work abroad. Sometimes the jobs offered are legitimate—the women earn money and help their families. But sometimes they are sold by human traffickers and are forced to work for free. In the worst cases, they are beaten or forced into prostitution. Click on the photo to the left to see an audiovisual feature about the problem—and to find out what Caritas is doing to help.

Photos by Katie Orlinsky or Laura Sheahen
Audio by Laura Sheahen

FAQs on human trafficking in Nepal

By |27 April 2012|

What is human trafficking? 

Human trafficking is a crime in which traffickers deceive and recruit people, often across national borders, for the purpose of exploitation (forced labour, beggary, prostitution or removal of organs). Traffickers often lure impoverished victims with false promises of good jobs. When a person is working against their will, is not being paid, and is unable to leave–or if the conditions of their work are not regulated–they may be victims of trafficking.

Where is Nepal and what is happening in Nepal? 

Nepal is an extremely poor country on the northeast border with India. Due to poverty and lack of jobs, many Nepali people consider working abroad to earn money for their families.

What kinds of fake jobs are being offered? 

Unscrupulous employment agents in Nepal might offer teenage girls work as a housemaid, or offer to make them a movie star in India. Other agents offer men construction jobs in the […]

In Nepal, a Walk Down Cheat Street

By |27 April 2012|

Caritas tries to offer at-risk people other options, giving small loans to poor women.

Happy to be home in Nepal

By |22 March 2012|

By Laura Sheahen

Thirty-year-old Madhu Tharu has been working for other people since she was a little girl. A bonded labourer in a village of bonded labourers, the Nepali woman basically belonged to her landlord. The system of serfdom that trapped her wasn’t abolished in Nepal until the early 2000s. So for years, she worked all day. Her brothers, at least, were allowed to go to school. As a kamalari–a servant girl– she wasn’t.

As teenagers, Madhu and thousands of girls like her were prime targets of traffickers, criminals who sell girls into forced prostitution or forced labour. As adults, women like Madhu are prime candidates for overseas work as housemaids. Uneducated and impoverished, they sometimes face physical and sexual abuse when working for Middle Eastern families in places like Kuwait.

Though some women do indeed earn money when they go abroad, the risks of migration are serious.  Even in the best […]

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