Domestic Workers

Women, men and children often suffer physical and verbal abuse when there are not proper laws to protect them

Domestic workers often don’t get a fair deal – especially if they are not working in their home country.

Women, men and children often suffer physical and verbal abuse when there are not proper laws to protect them. They can be refused any time off, or a limit to their working hours. Their access to a minimum wage or to social welfare systems is often denied. Some cruel employers withhold their wages and sometimes their passports.

Caritas lobbied hard for the adoption on 16th June 2011 of the International Labour Organisation’s Convention “Concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers.” It marks a substantial shift in the protection of domestic workers around the world by recognising their work as real and equal. By ratifying the Convention, governments agree to important measures to protect them, regulate employment agencies and prevent the exploitation of minors.

Now, Caritas has joined with the International Trade Union Confederation’s campaign, which pushes for the implementation of the Convention.

Caritas Updates on Domestic Workers

How Caritas works on Migration & Human Trafficking
Caritas addresses the issues around migration directly. It works to advise and protect all migrants – men, women and children – to prevent trafficking and abuse. Caritas advocates for the rights of domestic workers – who are often migrants – and for proper legal protection for all people who move to find work and security. Learn more.
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