August 7, 2013

International Youth Day focus on migration

By |7 August 2013|

International Youth Day is commemorated every year on 12 August. This year the theme is ‘Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward’.

May 8, 2013

Syria through the eyes of its children

By |8 May 2013|

Four million people have had their lives shattered by the war in Syria, half of them are children. For the millions of children still inside the country, everyday is a struggle.

September 25, 2012

Away alone: Protect children who migrate by themselves

By |25 September 2012|

Children migrating alone to other countries are vulnerable to abuse. Caritas calls for better protection for them and a stronger focus on their needs. Children migrate alone because their families want to protect them against violence or hunger, or want them to send money back to help the family. According to a 2010 study by Catholic Relief Services (Caritas member in the USA), abuses facing unaccompanied Central American children in Mexico ranged from robbery, extortion, intimidation, verbal abuse, and physical abuse, the last two being the most frequent. The CRS study says children suffered abuse while in transit, when apprehended, while in detention or during the deportation or repatriation process. Caritas members and church bodies in other parts of the world have reported similar situations of abuse. The United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child will discuss the contents and implications of the Convention on the Rights of the Child in the context [...]

June 18, 2012

  • Permalink Gallery

    Migrants brave deserts and shipwrecks to reach safety in Italy

Migrants brave deserts and shipwrecks to reach safety in Italy

By |18 June 2012|

At a migrant centre near the banks of the Tiber River, a Caritas case worker talks about an African woman targeted in her home country for political reasons: Caritas helped her pay her rent in Rome while she got on her feet.

March 22, 2012

Happy to be home in Nepal

By |22 March 2012|

By Laura Sheahen Thirty-year-old Madhu Tharu has been working for other people since she was a little girl. A bonded labourer in a village of bonded labourers, the Nepali woman basically belonged to her landlord. The system of serfdom that trapped her wasn’t abolished in Nepal until the early 2000s. So for years, she worked all day. Her brothers, at least, were allowed to go to school. As a kamalari--a servant girl-- she wasn’t. As teenagers, Madhu and thousands of girls like her were prime targets of traffickers, criminals who sell girls into forced prostitution or forced labour. As adults, women like Madhu are prime candidates for overseas work as housemaids. Uneducated and impoverished, they sometimes face physical and sexual abuse when working for Middle Eastern families in places like Kuwait. Though some women do indeed earn money when they go abroad, the risks of migration are serious.  Even in the best [...]

Female face of migration

By |7 March 2012|

When impoverished women decide to leave their countries to work abroad, they often are deceived or abused. Smugglers and human traffickers may exploit them, forcing them to work as unpaid prostitutes or beggars. Women who become domestic workers are sometimes beaten, overworked, or not paid. Many women leave behind their own families to care for others, making their children vulnerable. The Female Face of Migration, a report by Caritas Internationalis, describes the problems that migrant women face. Explore this page to learn more: read the policy paper, get to know to stories of four women, and play our interactive game “Follow the Migrant Woman” to see what choices you would make if you were a poor woman going abroad.

June 24, 2010

Pakistan’s child camel jockeys get a fresh start

By |24 June 2010|

Falak Sher took his young son and his nephew from their rural village in Pakistan’s Punjab region to race as camel jockeys in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 1998. He was in search of a fortune, but found a nightmare. Once there, his children were starved to keep their weights at the minimum for racing. They were given electric shocks as punishments for minor mistakes. “We were not allowed to leave the premises. It seemed we had landed in a prison,”he said. Camel racing is a hugely popular sport inmany Gulf States. As children weigh less, the camels go faster. Although the UAE repatriated 3000 child jockeys in 2005 to Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sudan, the use of children as jockeys in the Gulf States is still reported. Reintegrating the children has been a challenge. Despite a government scheme to get them back into school, many were reluctant. Parents and children [...]

February 24, 2009

All roads lead to Rome: Immigration in Italian capital

By |24 February 2009|

Italy and Nigeria recently reached an agreement to carry out joint patrols to control illegal immigration and trafficking.

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